This piece was originally published by Speak Out Revolution, a non-profit founded in 2020, with the belief that everyone who is made to feel uncomfortable, unsafe or disempowered at work should be empowered to Speak Out. Fill out the Speak Out survey to share your experiences.

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I remember graduating eight years ago vowing to never step foot in a university again. I was one of many fresh-faced graduates disillusioned by entry-level positions, which were just minimum wage internships dressed up in a shiny, corporate suit. With my mountain of student debt, I didn’t even want to entertain the idea of…


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Last week, I encountered an extremely uncomfortable workplace situation where I, as an autistic person, felt discriminated against and alone. This was the first time I experienced prejudice with employees who knew about my autism. Now, I know the discrimination was not coming from a bad place; just ignorance (this is the version I am going with), but this doesn’t discount the fact that I felt under attack.

What disappointed me the most was that two of my colleagues who claimed to be autistic allies did not call out the prejudiced views expressed by another colleague. I waited…..and instead received…


To mark International Women’s Day, I’m dedicating this post to all of the autistic women and girls who are repeatedly denied a formal Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis by medical professionals, and are forced to navigate neurotypical structures and institutions by themselves.

This is the reality for autistic women and girls, myself included, who had to wait 28 years to understand why my brain is wired differently. It’s a fact that more men than women are diagnosed with autism. Various studies suggest that the ratio of autistic males to females ranges from 2:1 to 16:1. The most-up-to-date estimate is 3:1…


What do you get if you give an uneducated celebrity free rein to exploit a marginalised community under the guise of art? You get ‘Music’ — a movie created by pop star turned director and sudden ‘autism expert’, Sia.

It has taken me some time to write a post about this because I wanted to do my research on the premise behind the movie and to speak to other autistic people about their take on it. However, after hearing that a neurotypical actress was assigned the role of the autistic lead and later reading Sia’s twitter thread justifying this ableism…


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I get this a lot. I’m often asked a question that has caught me off guard. My response? I stare at the person open-mouthed like a carp until I utter the phrase “huh…what did you say?” To which the person usually laughs and teases that I wasn’t paying attention. The truth is, I was. Autistic people are hyper in-tune with our surroundings and are aware of the minuscule details that others miss. So why does it appear that we are often absent minded?

The answer is that because we are so hyper aware of our surroundings: background conversations, loud music…


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Ever since I was a child, I remember being a total perfectionist. I would cry if I did not get the top score in a test and my face would swell with anger if my day did not go as planned. While other children would be playing in the sand pit getting messy, I would be the one too scared to play as I was worried about getting my clothes dirty. My need for total control and having an absolute meltdown when things were not perfect, was something that a six year old should never have to experience.

I still…


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Earlier this month, researchers at Yale University’s school of medicine published findings from a study linking distress and autism. The study, titled “Attend Less, Fear More: Elevated Distress to Social Threat in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder,” was supposed to examine toddlers’ (both autistic and non-autistic) reactions to fear-inducing situations. The goal of the research was to understand the development of emotional difficulties, such as anxiety and depression, in autistic children. I’ve read my fair share of uninspiring studies, often conducted by neurotypical researchers, linking autism to a wide range of things — from bad parenting to vaccines, so at…


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“She is autistic.” “ She is a person with autism”. At a first glance, these two statements communicate the same message — this is a person who identifies as autistic. However, there are tiny nuances between these statements that need to be addressed and understood by neurotypical people. When I was diagnosed, I didn’t know the difference until I started speaking with the wider autistic community and discovered that some of the language used to shape the autistic narrative can be harmful.

The first statement, which is ‘Identity-first language’, is how I prefer to be identified. I am autistic. Not…


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As my eyes scanned the seven-paged PDF file titled, ‘Confidential Psychological Assessment Report’, I knew I was going to finally find the answer for why I felt out of place. Paragraphs of medical terminology, ‘social cognition’, ‘behavioural observations’, ‘algorithms’, interspersed with my name and childhood memories. Reading my Autism report was one of the toughest things I have ever had to read; not because it is riddled with scientific jargon, but because it’s about me. …


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I’ve been living in Singapore for over a year, and if there’s one thing I’ve learnt from my time here is that shopping malls cause me pain. This is not an exaggeration. The sounds, bright lights and crowds hurt my brain and ears, causing me to abandon my shopping trolley or burst out crying.

I have especially noticed my reactions more while being in Singapore as shopping is a national hobby here. Malls are everywhere! One bad experience I had was while I was doing the grocery shop. I had my list in one hand, my shopping basket in the…

Sophie Longley

Clinical & community psychologist in the making. Autistic. Advocating for neurodiversity acceptance.

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